Sponsor Type
Federal/State
Country
United States
Grant Types
Fellowship/Scholarship/Dissertation Internship/Work-study Travel Other
 Contact Info
Phone
301-837-3250
Fax
301-837-3199
Address
Room 2200 8601 Adelphi Road College Park, MD 20740-6001
Last modified on 2018-06-28 21:29:09
Description
The Presidential Library system is composed of fourteen Presidential Libraries. These facilities are overseen by the Office of Presidential Libraries, in the National Archives and Records Administration. Presidential Libraries are archives and museums, bringing together the documents and artifacts of a President and his administration and presenting them to the public for study and discussion without regard for political considerations or affiliations. Presidential Libraries and Museums, like their holdings, belong to the American people. Many Presidential papers and records had been lost, destroyed, sold for profit, or ruined by poor storage conditions. In 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt sought a better alternative. Congress legislated this policy, passing the Presidential Libraries Act in 1955. Through archives, museums, and public programs, Presidential Libraries continue to preserve the documents and artifacts of our Presidents, helping us learn about our nation and our democracy. HISTORY The Presidential Library system formally began in 1939, when President Franklin Roosevelt donated his personal and Presidential papers to the Federal Government. At the same time, Roosevelt pledged part of his estate at Hyde Park to the United States, and friends of the President formed a non-profit corporation to raise funds for the construction of the library and museum building. Roosevelt's decision stemmed from a firm belief that Presidential papers are an important part of the national heritage and should be accessible to the public. He asked the National Archives to take custody of his papers and other historical materials and to administer his library. Before the advent of the Presidential Library system, Presidents or their heirs often dispersed Presidential papers at the end of the administration. Though many pre-Hoover collections now reside in the Library of Congress, others are split among other libraries, historical societies, and private collections. Sadly, many materials have been lost or deliberately destroyed. In 1950, Harry S. Truman decided that he, too, would build a library to house his Presidential papers and helped to galvanize congressional action. In 1955, Congress passed the Presidential Libraries Act, establishing a system of privately erected and federally maintained libraries. The Act encouraged other Presidents to donate their historical materials to the government and ensured the preservation of Presidential papers and their availability to the American people. Under this and subsequent acts, more libraries have been established. In each case, funds from private and nonfederal public sources provided the funds to build the library. Once completed, the private organization turned over the libraries to the National Archives and Records Administration to operate and maintain. Until 1978, Presidents, scholars, and legal professionals held the view dating back to George Washington that the records created by the President or his staff while in office remained the personal property of the President and were his to take with him when he left office. The first Presidential libraries were built on this concept. NARA successfully persuaded Presidents to donate their historical materials to the Government for housing in a Presidential library managed by NARA. The Presidential Records Act of 1978 established that the Presidential records that document the constitutional, statutory, and ceremonial duties of the President are the property of the United States Government. After the President leaves office, the Archivist of the United States assumes custody of the records. The Act allowed for the continuation of Presidential libraries as the repository for Presidential records. The Presidential Libraries Act of 1986 also made significant changes to Presidential libraries, requiring private endowments linked to the size of the facility. NARA uses these endowments to offset a portion of the maintenance costs for the library.
Sponsor Relationship
Most Recent Grants from This Sponsor
The Abba Schwartz fellowship is administered by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation from funds...
Added on 2021-04-01T23:36:51Z
The Marjorie Kovler Research Fellowship is administered by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation...
Added on 2021-04-01T23:36:38Z
The Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. Fellowship is administered by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation...
Added on 2021-04-01T23:36:32Z
The Theodore Sorensen Research Fellowship is administered by the John F. Kennedy Library...
Added on 2021-04-01T23:36:17Z
Deadline Approaching Grants
The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation funds stipend-based archival internships each year to...
Deadline on 2021-05-15T00:00:00Z
The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation funds stipend-based archival internships each year to...
Deadline on 2021-05-15T00:00:00Z
The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation funds stipend-based archival internships each year to...
Deadline on 2021-05-15T00:00:00Z